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Sydney researchers receive $41 million in NHMRC funding
四平青年1

10 December 2019
Boost for health and medical research projects
Researchers from the University of Sydney have received more than $41 million from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) to improve the health of Australians.

Helping people introduce regular bursts of strenuous physical activity in their daily routines and a printable collagen-based eye healant are two of the projects funded through the latest round of NHMRC grants for 2019.

Sydney researchers received 23 Ideas grants, 10 postgraduate scholarships, four Clinical Trials and Cohort Studies grants, three Targeted Calls for Research grants and a Synergy grant during the latest round.

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research), Professor Duncan Ivison said the funding was critical in helping researchers explore gaps in knowledge and undertake innovative research which has the potential to improve the quality of life and health of many.

“From improving organ transplant acceptance to research into Alzheimer’s and opioid addiction, these grants will help our researchers further their knowledge in a diverse range of fields and develop new preventions and treatments to help improve the quality of life for many,” Professor Ivison said.

“We’re very proud of those researchers who were successful in this round and we’re working hard to support those who are preparing to submit in future ones. Biomedical and clinical research is a huge part of our research endeavours at Sydney and we’re committed to doing even better.”

Highlights of grants awarded to Sydney researchers in this round include:

  • Professor Anthony Keech and his team were awarded a $4.2 million Clinical Trials and Cohort Studies Grant to investigate the ability of colchicine, a safe and commonly used anti-inflammatory drug, to inhibit atherosclerosis associated inflammation.
  • Dr Kylie Lee and her team were awarded a $2.6 million Ideas Grant to gain a better understanding of substance use among Indigenous Australians. The project aims to improve self-reported data on drug use while also providing an immediate and tailored brief intervention.
  • Associate Professor Graham Neely and his team were awarded a $2.5 million Targeted Calls for Research grant to define how per- and poly-fluoroalkyl (PFAS) substances impact health at the population and molecular levels. PFAS substances are synthetic chemicals which have been used over the past 80 years for industrial and household purposes, however, their health impact is unclear.  
  • Professor Susan Kurrle and her team were awarded a $1.4 million Targeted Calls for Research grant which will fund a study aiming to identify frail older people in hospital and provide treatment targeting their frailty symptoms, with treatment continuing in the community through their general practitioner. 
  • Professor Tricia McCabe and her team were awarded a $903,067 Clinical Trials and Cohort Studies Grant to compare treatments for children with apraxia, a severe speech disorder.

A full list of research projects administered by the University which received funding can be found on the NHMRC website

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